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Old 7th August 2012, 08:45 PM   #1
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let share about news in ASEAN and talk about problem and Asean Future

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASEAN


The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is a geo-political and economic organization of ten countries located in Southeast Asia, which was formed on 8 August 1967 by Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. Since then, membership has expanded to include Brunei, Burma (Myanmar), Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. Its aims include accelerating economic growth, social progress, cultural development among its members, protection of regional peace and stability, and opportunities for member countries to discuss differences peacefully.

ASEAN covers a land area of 4.46 million km², which is 3% of the total land area of Earth, and has a population of approximately 600 million people, which is 8.8% of the world's population. The sea area of ASEAN is about three times larger than its land counterpart. In 2010, its combined nominal GDP had grown to US$1.8 trillion.[11] If ASEAN were a single entity, it would rank as the ninth largest economy in the world, behind the United States, China, Japan, Germany, France, Brazil, the United Kingdom, and Italy.

ASEAN six majors refer to the six largest economies in the area with economies many times larger than the remaining four ASEAN countries.

The ASEAN six majors are (GDP nominal 2011 based on IMF data. The figures in parentheses are GDP PPP.)
Indonesia: 845,680 billions (1,124 billions)
Thailand: 345,649 billions (616 billions)
Malaysia: 278,680 billions (447 billions)
Singapore: 259,849 billions (315 billions)
Philippines: 213,129 billions (390 billions)
Vietnam: 122,722 billions (299 billions)
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Old 7th August 2012, 08:52 PM   #2
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China Pushes on the South China Sea, ASEAN Unity Collapses
http://www.jamestown.org/single/?no_...e5453b315ee4ba



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For more than two decades Beijing has pursued a consistent policy in the South China Sea composed of two main elements: gradually strengthening the country’s territorial and jurisdictional claims while at the same time endeavoring to assure Southeast Asian countries of its peaceful intentions. Recent moves by China to bolster its maritime claims have brought the first element into sharp relief, while reassurances of benign intent have, however, been in short supply. Indeed, far from assuaging Southeast Asian concerns regarding its assertive behavior, China has fuelled them by brazenly exploiting divisions within the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to further its own national interests.

China Hardens Its Stance

Commentaries in China’s state-run media analyzing the South China Sea issue have become markedly less conciliatory. Opinion pieces highlight several new themes in China’s official line. One theme is that China’s territory, sovereignty as well as its maritime rights and interests increasingly are being challenged by Southeast Asian nations and Japan in the South and East China Seas. China’s response, it is argued, should be to uphold its claims more vigorously, increase its military presence in contested waters, and, if necessary, be prepared to implement coercive measures against other countries. As one commentary notes “Cooperation must be in good faith, competition must be strong, and confrontation must be resolute” (Caixin, July 13).

Another theme is that, while China has shown restraint, countries such as the Philippines and Vietnam have been pursuing provocative and illegal actions in a bid to “plunder” maritime resources such as hydrocarbons and fisheries which China regards as its own (China Daily, July 30).

A third theme is that Manila and Hanoi continue to encourage U.S. “meddling” in the South China Sea and that the United States uses the dispute as a pretext to “pivot” its military forces toward Asia (Global Times, July 11). To reverse these negative trends, Chinese commentators have urged the government to adopt more resolute measures toward disputed territories and maritime boundaries. Nationalist sentiment, they argue, demands no less.

Recent measures undertaken by the Chinese authorities do indeed suggest a more hard-line position. Ominously, some of the initiatives have included a strong military element, presumably as a warning to the other claimants that China is ready to play hardball.

Perhaps the most noteworthy attempt by China to bolster its jurisdictional claims in the South China Sea was the raising of the administrative status of Sansha from county to prefecture level in June. Sansha originally was established in 2007 as an administrative mechanism to “govern” the Paracel Islands, Macclesfield Bank and the Spratly Islands. Sansha’s elevation was an immediate response to a law passed on June 21 by Vietnam’s national assembly, which reiterated Hanoi’s sovereignty claims to the Paracels and Spratlys. Both Vietnam and China protested the other’s move as a violation of their sovereignty (Bloomberg, June 21). Less than a month later, Sansha’s municipal authorities elected a mayor and three deputy mayors and China’s Central Military Commission authorized the establishment of a garrison for “managing the city’s national defense mobilization, military reserves and carrying out military operations (Xinhua, July 20).

Earlier, in late June, China’s Defense Ministry announced it had begun “combat ready” patrols in the Spratly Islands to “protect national sovereignty and [China’s] security development interests” (Reuters, June 28). Embarrassingly for the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Navy, however, on July 13, one of its frigates ran aground on Half Moon Shoal, 70 miles west of the Philippine island of Palawan and within the Philippines 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ). The frigate was refloated within 24 hours, suggesting that other PLA Navy vessels were nearby when the incident occurred. These developments provide further evidence of the growing militarization of the dispute.

China also has moved to undercut the claims and commercial activities of the Philippines and Vietnam in the South China Sea in other ways.

In June, the state-run China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC) invited foreign energy companies to bid for exploration rights in nine blocks in the South China Sea. The blocks lie completely within Vietnam’s EEZ and overlap with those offered for development to foreign energy corporations by state-owned PetroVietnam. Accordingly, Hanoi vigorously protested CNOOC’s tender (Bloomberg, June 27). More importantly the blocks are located at the edge of China’s nine-dash line map and seem to support the argument that Beijing interprets the dashes as representing the outermost limits of its “historic rights” in the South China Sea. Under the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), however, coastal states are not entitled to “historic rights” on the high seas. It is therefore unlikely that any of the major energy giants will bid for CNOOC’s blocks—although smaller companies may do so if only to curry favor with Beijing with a view to landing more lucrative contracts down the road. If, however, exploration does move forward in any of the nine blocks, a clash between Vietnamese and Chinese coast guard vessels will become a very real possibility.

On the issue of ownership of Scarborough Shoal, scene of a tense standoff between Chinese and Philippines fishery protection vessels in May-June, China position remains uncompromising. At the annual ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF) in Phnom Penh, Cambodia in July, Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi restated China’s sovereignty claims to the shoal, rejected the notion that it was disputed and accused Manila of “making trouble” (Xinhua, July 13). According to the Philippine foreign ministry, Chinese trawlers―protected by Chinese paramilitary vessels—continue to fish in waters close to Scarborough Shoal in contravention of a bilateral accord whereby both sides agreed to withdraw their vessels [1].

Following the ARF, China kept up the pressure on the Philippines. In mid-July, it dispatched a flotilla of 30 fishing trawlers to the Spratlys escorted by the 3,000-ton fisheries administration vessel Yuzheng 310 (Xinhua, July 15). The trawlers collected coral and fished near Philippine-controlled Pag-asa Island and Chinese-controlled Mischief and Subi Reefs (Philippine Daily Inquirer, July 27). The Philippine authorities monitored the situation but took no action.

The Phnom Penh Debacle

In the past, after China has undertaken assertive actions in the South China Sea it has tried to calm Southeast Asia’s jangled nerves. At the series of ASEAN-led meetings in Phnom Penh in mid-July, however, Chinese officials offered virtually no reassurances to their Southeast Asian counterparts. Worse still, China seems to have utilized its influence with Cambodia to scupper attempts by ASEAN to address the problem, causing a breakdown in ASEAN unity.

In the final stages of the annual meeting of ASEAN foreign ministers (known as the ASEAN Ministerial Meeting or AMM), the Philippines and Vietnam wanted the final communiqué to reflect their serious concerns regarding the Scarborough Shoal incident and the CNOOC tender. They were supported by Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand who felt that ASEAN should speak with one voice. Cambodia—which holds the rotating chairmanship of ASEAN and has close political and economic ties with China— objected because, in the words of Foreign Minister Hor Namhong, “ASEAN cannot be used as a tribunal for bilateral disputes” (Straits Times, July 22). Attempts by Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa to reach a compromise on the wording were unsuccessful and for the first time in its 45-year history the AMM did not issue a final communiqué.

The fallout from the AMM was immediate and ugly. Natalegawa labelled ASEAN’s failure to reach agreement “irresponsible” and that the organization’s centrality in the building of the regional security architecture had been put at risk (Straits Times, July 16). Singapore’s Foreign Minister, K. Shanmugam described the fiasco as a “sever dent” in ASEAN’s credibility (Straits Times, July 14). Cambodia and the Philippines blamed the failure on each other. Cambodia was pilloried by the regional press for its lack of leadership and for putting its bilateral relationship with China before the overall interests of ASEAN. One analyst alleged Cambodian officials had consulted with their Chinese counterparts during the final stages of talks to reach an agreement on the communiqué [2]. China’s Global Times characterized the outcome of the AMM as a victory for China, which does not think ASEAN is an appropriate venue to discuss the dispute, and a defeat for the Philippines and Vietnam (Global Times, July 16).

A few days after the AMM, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono dispatched his foreign minister to five Southeast Asian capitals in an effort to restore ASEAN unity. Natalegawa’s shuttle diplomacy resulted in an ASEAN foreign minister’s statement of July 20 on “ASEAN’s Six-Point Principles on the South China Sea” [3]. The six points, however, broke no new ground and merely reaffirmed ASEAN’s bottom line consensus on the South China Sea. In response to the joint statement, China’s Foreign Ministry said it would work with ASEAN to implement the 2002 Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea (DoC) (Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, July 21).

.....
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Old 7th August 2012, 08:55 PM   #3
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i think this "issue" can "break" Asean Unity, as we know that China is the most powerful economic country in Asia, China has a good diplomacy to other country and have a great military, so if Asean can't handle this issue (especially between two country, PHP and CNA) i think china can do "anything" to get what they want.

and here some latest news about this problem, taken from singapore news

South China Sea disagreements will test ASEAN: ESM Goh
By Qiuyi Tan | Posted: 02 August 2012 1247 hrs

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stori...217379/1/.html

Quote:
SINGAPORE: Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong said the disagreements over the South China Sea will continue to test ASEAN's ability to forge consensus on difficult political issues.

Mr Goh said this on Thursday morning at an ASEAN and Asia forum organised by the Singapore Institute of International Affairs. Some 300 business leaders attended the forum.

His comments comes as ASEAN foreign ministers failed to issue a joint communique at the recent annual ASEAN Ministerial Meeting (AMM) in July because of disagreements over the South China Sea.

Mr Goh said: "Whether we like it or not, after the 45th AMM, the South China Sea will remain a test case of ASEAN's ability to forge consensus on difficult problems and act in the region's broader interests."

A goal that encompasses such interests is the setting up of the ASEAN Economic Community by 2015.

Mr Goh said ASEAN's economic integration cannot be insulated from its ability to maintain unity on important issues and stability in the region.

He said ASEAN's dialogue partners and investors are watching and re-calculating their interests and positions.

"We cannot blame them for this. It is therefore imperative that we address their concerns and demonstrate that we're capable of reaching consensus on even the most sensitive of issues," Mr Goh said.

Analysts agreed with Mr Goh's view.

Pushpanathan Sundram, managing director of EAS Strategic Advice said: "Investments come into the region because the region is stable, the region is peaceful, the region is growing, and the region is an engine for growth.

"So if this doesn't come through the way we handle the South China Sea issue, then the long term I think this will impact on investors."

But in the short term, Mr Pushpanathan does not expect investors to be put off.

Several ASEAN members and China have competing claims over the South China Sea.

Jusuf Wanandi, senior fellow with the Centre for Strategic and International Studies, said: "Definitely ASEAN should not get involved in the claims and counter-claims of the individual members. These are for them to solve with China.

"Because it's a historical problem with them so it's an overlapping claim so we cannot get involved with that because it's sovereignty problems.

"What we can do however, is to create the atmosphere and the environment where then they are willing to cooperate in solving that problem in the future."

The answer may lie in a regional Code of Conduct that ASEAN is hoping to draw up with China to regulate negotiations on the South China Sea.

Even so, there are questions on how this will be carried out as ASEAN gears up for its next summit in November 2012.
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Old 7th August 2012, 08:59 PM   #4
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Irony Behind Rohingya Crisis
An analysis by Parameswaran Ponnudurai
2012-08-04


http://www.rfa.org/english/east-asia...012220302.html


Indonesians pray outside the Burmese embassy in Jakarta in a protest rally denouncing Burma's discrimination against the Rohingya Muslim minority, July 26, 2012.



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The discrimination against minority Rohingya Muslims is occurring in a region with the world’s biggest Muslim population. It may be an irony that some of the world’s worst discrimination against an ethnic Muslim minority has been occurring in Southeast Asia, home to the world’s biggest Muslim population.

While much of the blame for the discrimination against Burma’s ethnic Muslim Rohingya has been put on the government, questions are being asked as to why Muslim leaders in other countries in the region didn’t exert their influence on Burma's previous ruling military junta, under whose watch much of the abuse against the group allegedly occurred.

After all, Indonesia, the biggest state in Southeast Asia and the world’s most populous Muslim nation, has been a key player in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), of which Burma is a member.

ASEAN also includes two other predominantly Muslim countries—Malaysia and oil-rich Brunei, both of which have close ties with Burma—as well as Thailand, Singapore, the Philippines, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam, where there are sizable Muslim populations.

"It is some sort of an ambiguity that Southeast Asia has the biggest number of Muslims, and yet governments and particularly Muslims in the region have been living with this decades-old Rohingya problem in their own backyard," Haris Azhar, coordinator for Indonesia's human rights advocacy group KontraS, told RFA.

He said that Southeast Asian governments were hesitant to push the Rohingya issue with the Burmese authorities, fearing they themselves might come under scrutiny for alleged human rights abuses in their countries.

"Both the governments and Muslim groups have to bear responsibility for this—most governments, until only recently, have viewed human rights as taboo and [thought that] questioning Rohingya abuses would point to rights abuses occurring in their own countries," Haris said.

Military dictatorship

Indonesia, for decades under the late President Suharto's military dictatorship, had been under fire for blatant rights abuses, and multiracial Malaysia has its own history of ethnic problems, while Brunei is led by a sultan who rules by decree without elections.

Member states of ASEAN also have a long tradition of not questioning each other on rights issues, as doing so may be construed as interference in domestic affairs. Even blatant rights abuses by Burma's generals during the decades of harsh rule under the military junta were hardly raised at the ASEAN meetings.

But with the discrimination against Rohingyas flaring into a major international issue following the deadly June violence in Burma’s Buddhist majority Rakhine state, Muslims in the region are beginning to grill their governments over the perceived couldn't-care-less approach toward protection of the rights of their brethren.

Both the Rakhines and the Rohingyas have been blamed for sparking the violence, but human rights groups say Rohingyas have borne the brunt of action by the Burmese security forces.

The debate in Indonesia particularly has been intense as Muslims mobbed the Burmese embassy in Jakarta, protesting against the Burmese government's harsh treatment of the 800,000 Rohingyas, considered outsiders by many Burmese even though they have lived in the country for generations.

The U.N. has called them a stateless people and one of the most persecuted groups in the world.

Hardline position

Burmese President Thein Sein may have been pushing ahead with democratic and economic reforms, but when it comes to the future of the Rohingya, he takes a hard line approach—he wants them herded into U.N. refugee camps or just deported from the country.

The hardline position has sparked anger among many Muslims in neighboring nations who are pressing governments to uphold the human rights of the Rohingya.

Indonesian House of Representatives Deputy Speaker Pramono Anung criticized his government's “late” response to the Rohingya crisis as President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's administration scrambled to contain any damage from its diplomatic inaction following the June violence.

“Our international diplomacy is often late and shows indecisiveness, even though we are one of the largest democratic countries as well as being the largest Muslim country,” Pramono told the Jakarta Globe newspaper.

Indonesia should “immediately announce our support for the Rohingya to assure the public, and global community, that we care about what has been going on in Myanmar [Burma],” he said, according to the Jakarta Post.

As pressure mounted from Muslim groups for swift action, Indonesian foreign minister Marty Natalegawa broke his silence this week, saying Jakarta would raise the Rohingya problem at an extraordinary summit of the 57-nation Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) in Mecca, Saudi Arabia on August 14-15.

"The Myanmar government's treatment of Rohingya Muslims is not in line with its recent efforts to move towards democracy," Natalegawa was quoted by Indonesia's Antara news agency as saying. "Any act of discrimination on the basis of religion or ethnicity is unacceptable."

The Rohingya crisis and the current civil war in Syria both demand the "urgent intervention" of the OIC to "protect civilian lives," a daily in Brunei said.

"[T]he Rohingyas are facing a catalog of discrimination in their homeland while thousands are languishing as refugees in Thailand and Bangladesh," the Brunei Times said in a recent editorial.

Clamor for action

The ASEAN grouping, whose population of 240 million Muslims is greater than that in the Middle East, has also become vocal amid the clamor for action.

Its secretary-general, Surin Pitsuwan, has asked Burma for a "full explanation" of the June violence in which rights groups said the Rohingyas were deliberately targeted by government forces.

"There will be a full explanation from Myanmar [Burma] because this is an important and critical issue for ASEAN as a community," Surin was reported saying. The explanation, he said, would be given at the United Nations in New York in September on the sidelines of its General Assembly.

ASEAN had discussed with Burmese Foreign Minister Wunna Maung Lwin, but he said, “We haven’t heard anything specific or concrete on the matter,” Surin said.

The Burmese government said in a statement this week published on the ASEAN website that the government had "exercised maximum restraint in order to restore law and order" amid the violence in Rakhine state.

"As such, Myanmar [Burma] strongly rejects the accusations made by some quarters that abuses and excessive use of force were made by the authorities in dealing with the situation," the statement said.

Official figures showed more than 70,000 people were displaced in the violence and that at least 78 died, but unofficial estimates have been higher. The United Nations has called for a "prompt, independent investigation."

Mohamed Azmi Abdul Hamid, the Secretary-General of Malaysian Consultative Council of Islamic Non-Governmental Organizations, called on the ASEAN grouping to "facilitate a solution" in a bid to end the Rohingya crisis.

The Malaysian government should "raise the problem of the Rohingyas in ASEAN meetings and find a solution to their statelessness and violation of human rights," said S.M. Mohamed Idris, chairman of the Malaysian-based Citizens International group.

Regional mechanism

Three years ago, ASEAN leaders agreed to use a regional mechanism known as the "Bali process" to stem an exodus of Rohingyas fleeing Burma to neighboring nations.

The Bali process was established in 2002 and involves more than 50 countries committed to taking steps to help combat human-smuggling and trafficking, and related transnational crimes in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond.

But the region's leaders have not moved to help bring about a political solution to the problem.

"Despite the noninterference principle which must be respected by the ASEAN member states, the ASEAN Charter also urges the member states to adhere to the principles of protecting of human rights," said Mochammad Faisal Karim, an international relations expert at Indonesia's Binus University.

"Yet, each time the two principles collide, it is more likely that ASEAN will follow the noninterference principle rather than the human rights principle," he said, suggesting that Indonesia show leadership and "voice the responsibility of the protection [of human rights] principle within ASEAN."
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Old 7th August 2012, 09:12 PM   #5
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again

ASEAN Foreign Ministers Release Statement on the South China Sea
http://cogitasia.com/category/asean/

After failing to reach agreement on a joint communique during the ASEAN Ministerial Meeting consultations last week for the first time in its 45 year history, the ten ASEAN countries released the statement below on the South China Sea following a diplomatic effort by Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa of Indonesia.

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Old 7th August 2012, 09:37 PM   #6
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again

ASEAN Foreign Ministers Release Statement on the South China Sea
http://cogitasia.com/category/asean/

After failing to reach agreement on a joint communique during the ASEAN Ministerial Meeting consultations last week for the first time in its 45 year history, the ten ASEAN countries released the statement below on the South China Sea following a diplomatic effort by Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa of Indonesia.

Even if ASEAN unites, It would still difficult to match againts China economically and in militer. That's why now US is trying to nurture relationships with almost all ASEAN countries, while start building base in Oz

What ASEAN should do is to unite and to take distance againts both China and USA. ASEAN is a ground for China vs USA whether you realize it or not
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Old 28th August 2012, 09:55 AM   #7
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asean closed eyes when there is Rohingya Tragedi ???
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Old 28th August 2012, 03:20 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by admin View Post
Even if ASEAN unites, It would still difficult to match againts China economically and in militer. That's why now US is trying to nurture relationships with almost all ASEAN countries, while start building base in Oz

What ASEAN should do is to unite and to take distance againts both China and USA. ASEAN is a ground for China vs USA whether you realize it or not
so true min, but IMO i believe that ASEAN can be one of the biggest economical region. its true, we have Indonesia, Thailand, Philipine, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam and the other country who "growing above average" in the world.

geeeee its so "fun" to see China and USA "playing world political and economical softly" its true, because USA aware about the power of china.


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asean closed eyes when there is Rohingya Tragedi ???
no.. no.. Asean sudah melakukan upaya terbaik, termasuk berkoordinasi dengan OKI tentang masalah itu, namun masalah di Myanmar itu terkait isu sensitif dari myanmar itu yang sebenarnya sangat komples, masalah dengan etnis disana bukan hanya rohingnya, tetapi dengan etnis lainnya. hal ini juga berkaitan dengan prinsip umum kedauatan negara par in parem non habet imperium yang berarti suatu negara berdaulat dilarang mencampuri urusan "dalam negeri" negara berdaulat lainnya.
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Old 29th August 2012, 10:09 AM   #9
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sorry, I can't speak english.. hehehe.. I think about rohingya, belum ada solusinya..
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Old 29th August 2012, 03:20 PM   #10
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^ speak in Bahasa its okay.


iya betul, sampai sekarang belum ada resolusi yang berarti untuk masalah di myanmar, tetapi diharapkan "dengan seiringnya" myanmar menjadi pemimpin asean pada periode ini, mudah2an saja myanmar mau "membuka" diri untuk jalur perdamaian dari negara lain untuk dalam negerinya
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